Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110701
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
quietly] they're still sleeping. how can i get it done. i should have brought a big bag or something like that. any way i just put his head - and then then stash him in my kimono. i can't get in front of them. easy. this is a big hour. my next victim. [snickering quietly] next. bet i capture 150. my body is full of many herring. [laughing] where is my robe. it's missing. a temple god must have taken my ladder away. the man started pacing back and forth wondering how to get down. so, the sunlight made one of the birds wake up. bird:i can't breathe. so i must be catching a bad cold. i drank too much, saki rice wine last night. was a little tipsy. i don't remember. any way. think can't move. someone is leaning on me so who is it. my cousin. my brother. we've been got by a hunter. hey! my cousin, wake up. no. not a good morning. we've been caught by a hunter. pass the word but be quiet okay. okay. wake up, wake up, wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. wake up. hey! did you wake up? we've been caught by a hunter. right. i got a good plan. just do what i say. at the count of t
have those big social differences within our town. this is just shortly a slide that shows you what already has been polled, that denmark and the netherlands, they are in fact far ahead of all of the other european countries and belgium is somewhere in-between making an effort but for sure also at this trip, i have been able to learn a lot from my european colleagues in denmark and in the netherlands. brussels is in the heart of europe and i think it's also has been a very good thing that there is european regulations, although at this moment, european regulations are mainly on achieving certain environmental standards. let's say pollution by co2 and particles. but that has helped us as we had too high air pollution in brussels as it was sanctioned by the european union that we really could stress on alternative mobility. we don't wait until european legislation or regulation coming up. we also have no brussels, no belgium, but european towns, towns in europe, trying to find one another and to press, to put pressure on mayors and regional ministers to commit themselves to invest in
. that was a special big garden, a forest, where all types of trees and flowers grew. the trees bending down gently flinging branches. our orchard grew like a crown on the sun's eyebrow. where did humbaba come from? his mother was just a cave, his father unknown. who made him a friend pretending guardian of the orchard. did those nice shrubs need fear to go begging for a garden and have humbaba in his treachery ilk. those plants and flowers were like books everyone could read, not cut and throw away. their different fantastic colors had formed our blood so our veins ran smoothly, our 7 wonders showed. then humbaba made a whirlwind of fire and snow. who crowned him king? who showed him our garden was but a jail? humbaba was great and scary, but not so very strong, though no one could ever conquer him as no one would ever try. time and again, when things grew old, humbaba alone believed himself eternal and young, still powerful, able to defeat all. humbaba didn't want to know one fact: that accumulation will lead to eruptive change. but, sadly, when suddenly he realized it after all, he chose to chec
so that they are stable and do not drain the general fund. that is a big aspect of it. another huge issue is the deferred maintenance on our infrastructure. we have a lot of infrastructure that has been deteriorating because we have not maintained properly. that includes roads, sewer systems, muni. we need to be much more diligent about maintaining our infrastructure. some of the big citywide issues that impact the district include transportation. we had more muni service and some other districts. it is not always reliable. some of the major bus lines in the district are not reliable. we have major projects like the renovation of delores park. it is an opportunity to define what the park is and what changes we want to make to it. that is going to be and port project, the same thing with glen canyon that is going to undergo a lot of work. one of the most challenging parts of the new district supervisor is that we elect the supervisors by district. it is very important to pay attention to the district, be engaged in the projects in the district. we also represent the whole city. any d
big boxes and play over them. >> (speaking spanish). >> but for the blacks these type of instruments were not allowed to be played because they were too loud and for the church they will provoke movement that was not appropriate. >> (speaking spanish). >> they could also work as a form of communication with the drumming patterns. >> (speaking spanish). >> this was what was going on in africa. >> (speaking spanish). >> and from some of the sounds they used to play that we almost lost all of them we still have some that he remembers. >> (speaking spanish). >> for instance -- >> (speaking spanish). >> this means "attention be alert. something is going to happen". >> (speaking spanish). >> wake up. wake up. >> wake up, wake up. (speaking spanish). >> and this are some of the drumming patterns that have been rescued by the cultural association. >> (speaking spanish). >> the african and review itse s size. >> (speaking spanish). >> to the actual size that he has. >> (speaking spanish). >> the reason why this drum was reduced in its size it was the intention of hiding it
and colleges in atlanta. entrepreneurship is a big part of it. i did not understand and nobody told me what is involved with buying your own home until i was in my second law school, where is the my counterparts, the white students i was in class with, they had had that information coming up. it was just second nature. i asked the guy across the hall from me what his folks did. but told him my mom was a nurse and my dad was a teacher, a soldier before. he said his father was the deputy prime minister of jordan. i was like, "ok." minute court partner -- my moot court partner, he said his father owned three swiss banks. i think even before entrepreneurship, it is financial literacy. we need to educate ourselves about what these resources are. it is financial literacy and really wealth literacy, understanding that there are different kinds of wealth beyond just monetary wealth, but you need to understand monetary wealth, spiritual well, the social capital we have and understand how to cultivate those things and invest them properly. those are important skills. at the same time, i do not think
it at scale, and that has been the big challenge. >> can you elaborate on that? what does that mean exactly? >> we would not exist if there was not a feeling that a lot of these communities do not have the experience online of finding the information that is most relevant to them. there are a lot of great weekly newspapers. there are a lot of bulletin boards, facebook woods, you name it. there is a lot of media focused at local, but not every community has it, and even the ones that do often are not getting the kind of service that i think they used to historical because of downsizing and regional newspapers not serving those communities the way they used to. so you will have the council meeting not really being covered. we have had numerous examples where board meetings, council meetings, things that those members got used to not being covered. suddenly, they were seeing the week after week and seeing that we were there to stay. >> in the audience, do you feel like you're communities are being covered well? do you know what is going on in your back yard? do you feel like your stories being
established? >> a big one will be in the middle of march. we will get cost analysis from the retirement system on proposals out there. we will be gauging people's reactions to those numbers as a key market. the first couple of weeks of may will be important. that is when various proposals will be introduced in these chambers for the november ballot. june and july is when the board will vote on what goes in front of the electorate in november. those are the key milestones. >> talk about homelessness and how you are planning to deal with that as an issue. >> the key there is funding. everything gets back to that issue. we have a number of wonderful plans in place on how to address the homeless issue. we just cannot afford to. we continue to cut funding to shelters, public health programs that help our homeless population. if we were able to do what we have in place and fund that, we would be a better position on that issue. >> are there any specific programs with respect to homelessness that you feel are moving us in the right direction? >> the watershed moment was 2002 when gavin newsom passed
to eat these big ice creams in cuba, used lots of cream. most dominica patrons were male but a few foreign women venturing to the famous establishment in the company of men from the court. one of these women was my grandmother, merced moynihan. in la dominica, one of the best cafes in the world, located on oreilly street, where my grandparents met. ticket to ride, i talk about my family history but after they marry -- i am reading a little from the book -- my grandparents were at the center of many fascinating things. i found myself at el centro, the literary and musical gatherings. their house on calle mercades became a cultural cross roads with the traffic of foreigners created a new inspired geography. they travel everywhere. my grandmother, merced, nina played the piano and read poems, while edward read the poems besides playing the fiddle and violin, behaved like an avant garde composer, moving around furniture. according to the journalist were a dynamic duo that rescued the famous hotel sevilla from dereliction in 1919. they also constructed the biltmore neighborhood where ma
know who you can call to get a cab. i am a big believer in pedestrian bicycling as options to get around town. many cities in the world have far more people working or on bicycles into blocking or on bicycles. they are pleasant most of transit and are efficient. -- many cities in the world have far more people walking or on bicycles. they are pleasant and efficient forms of transportation. that will take cars off the road and make it easier for those who drive. if we want to create a world- class transportation system, we have to make a commitment to each of these modes of transit to allow us to move where we need to go. >> is it safe for pedestrians on the streets? >> it is not. in recent years, we have had too many pedestrian accidents. there are estimates it costs our cities several hundred millions a year because of traffic accidents, injuries, and fatalities. i am asking one of our transit agencies to study where we're spending our dollars around the district and whether we invested more money would help to reduce our overall costs that come when a pedestrian is hit by a car.
, "side-by-side." we also thank the wonderful hydra menendez for inviting us today. let's have a big hand for the mckinley elementary school choir. [applause] they are being led by second grade teacher miss yang, miss vantia, miss bryant, and miss petrokie. i think our principal is in here somewhere. ok. there is our principal, rosa song. there she is. [applause] all right. we are ready. ♪ [piano playing] ♪ [piano playing] [piano music playing] [applause] [piano playing] [applause] [piano playing] >> give it up one more time for the mckinley elementary second and third graders. [applause] >> i'd like to acknowledge scott wiener. thank you for joining us. i'd like to acknowledge my colleague, sandy, for joinin gus. -- joining us. and at this time, i'd like to welcome ed lee, the mayor of san francisco. [applause] >> thank you, hydra and mckinley students. thank you very much. supervisor weiner, i thin kwe k we have the official song, next time i go t otho the boardf supervisors, we need side by side. we ain't got a barrell of money. thank you for coming today. i want to say that i reme
of music that's a big part of the book, you're in the middle of it, and i wanted to ask you about, in particular, one song and one period of time. crosby, stills, nash, and young, top of the world, teach your children is riding the charts, and then we have the horrible shooting at kent state, and neil young walks in with a song. and today, you'd have a meeting of the marketing department, and say, "no, teach your children "has got to run another 24 weeks, "and then we can cycle it out, and we'll never record and release anything like ohio." what was that conversation about? abandoning-- literally abandoning a hit record in favor of a statement. you're right; it's something that couldn't happen now. we have different people running the record companies now. they're lawyers and accountants, and they absolutely wouldn't do that. we were in a position then when we were very strong, and we had an ally: ahmet ertegun, who was one of the really great old men of the record business and a gentleman and our mentor. nash did an astounding thing, because that was his song that was going up th
and sumo wrestlers and how they get so big and what it's like in their culture. one of the brothers becomes an sumo and that's why it's a big book! [laughter]. >> do you think that -- being a woman who is in women have been oppressed -- i don't know if they are now or not, dou think that has stimulated you in your writing coming out of that? you specifically and in general, do you feel like a lot of women have been stimulated by being part of an oppressed class? >> good question. >> very much so. i will try to answer a, b, c. for me, i know that the first thing i began to think about when i thought i wanted to write a novel was that i wanted to write about my culture. and because i had grownup in the chinese culture i wanted to write about china. i wanted to find out more about myself because of i was raised in the bay area and because i didn't know culturally a lot of things i wanted to know. i knew i wasn't going to write about myself and knew that i was not going to write about my family. but i wanted to write about an aspect about china and women. those were the 2 things i knew when
to make their own instruments. >> (speaking spanish). >> so they use the surroundings and big jars and they used to have water or other type was drinks. >> (speaking spanish). >> covered with leather skin. >> (speaking spanish). >> and they make the drums. >>. >> (speaking spanish). (drums). (applause). >> (speaking spanish). >> this instrument is called dungo. >> spr (speaking spanish). >> we have two but only one was used. >> (speaking spanish). >> this is one that was used north of the capital. >> (speaking spanish). >> in the cities of the country >> (speaking spanish). >> when he was a child he was able to see those instruments and on extension today. (drums). (applause) . >> this is a donkey's jaw. it could be a horse or a donkey. >> donkey's jaw. >> and it's played by spiking it and to make the rattle sound and also creates this. (applause). >> (speaking spanish) sorry. (speaking spanish). >> this is the kahita and it is created as the -- i don't know that word. how do you say that? the piggy bank. you know where the boxes and the churches collect money? yeah. this is
. gentlemen, are you looking for a room. we have the best bed. very comfortable and a beautiful big bathtub. nice and hot. sounds good. what do you think? nice hot bathtub. comfortable futon sounds good to be. we'll stay here tonight. thank you very much. this way please. upstairs please. thank you. your well co. and this will be your room. here are your bathrobes and the bathroom is through there and i'm,ihache and if you have any problems, let me know. thank you and enjoy your bath. he puts the three young men in the room right next door to the samurai. nice hot bath. feels good after a day of traveling. [singing] feels good huh? hey! why don't we have a party tonight. great idea. let's invite some geisha girls. we're on holiday so let's order the very best saki. later that night. [whispering] whoa! three gorgeous geisha girls come on in. okay. let's start the party. [music] whoa! yeah. hey! [music] [laughter] [singing] in the next room, the samurai was trying write a letter. [music playing in background],iha chi. iha chi! the samurai is calling me. i wonder what is wrong. did you call me
neighborhood, mostly. i was sort of a spaced-out kid, destined obviously to be a poet. i was this big at 13 and i was a good rollerskater and the kids were amazed and they befriended me. after a while, they recognized that i had some sort of athletic ability and because i was so spaced out, they mistook it for great courage and if they pushed me, i pushed them back. it was just like a game. so they took to me and asked me to join the shamrocks. i even changed my name from ed vega to ed mcveigh. and this is how they passed me off because most of the teams they played were other irish kids. this was a regular football team so, consequently, they listed me as eddie mcveigh. it was great fun and my friends were jimmy flynn, paddy o'connor. my siblings married the shenny's and i almost married a catherine finerin but it didn't work out. i have a nephew, sean patrick mcflynn. i always question myself because my writing about the irish is really my writing about myself coming to the united states and coming into contact with the united states so consequently my puerto rican friends, and some of my
the business model in the media always changes. the big one that everyone has seen in their lifetime is, when i was a kid, tv was free. across america, it was funded by advertisers. today, the vast majority of americans pay a fee to get television. if the contact mix is right, hard journalism, entertainment, people will pay. all along the spectrum from the complete the paid to be completely ad-funded, you see it all today. one of the crisis we have now is the old model of classified advertising, paying for hard news journalism on paper has broken the, and is being replaced. that business model change had been a constant for 150 years. there are millions of models that work, and will be, and capital can chase them, as you get a 10x return, as you described. >> we want to get to everyone's questions. >> my name is alex. i have heard two major themes about new media. one, that it has a radical democratic potential, low barrier to entry, but i have also heard repeated again and again, in order for your model to be successful, in order for your web site to be successful, you have to hitch your wagon
for themselves and their children, to increase the likelihood that little problems won't turn into great big problems. yes. and fran, what do we tell parents in those situations? i think we tell parents... both jane and jordan talked about the role of parents and how important in each of their stories that parents have. they are the first line to see their young people changing their behaviors, as jane was saying, some of the signs that are out there. we need to tell parents and remind them, first and foremost, that addiction is a disease and it is not their fault. and it is not their young person's fault. they need to know that as well. and if they do what jane said, listen, watch their young people, be interactive with them, get to know their friends, they need to know the signs of what is a normal life for a young person. and when their child begins to act a little differently than they used to act 2 or 3 years ago, that should send some signals to go get help. jordan, your parents obviously saw signs in you. they may not have understood it, and that's okay. we are not asking everyone to
to exist, right? our strategy in the old days was to align ourselves with a big media company -- cbs. we align ourselves with yahoo! in some way and with ail -- aol in another way. you need the types of connections with more established or at least larger players in order to survive. the other reason is that the proliferation of sites has caused a change in the way people get their news. no longer do they just go to what we call destination sites, which was essentially a newspaper online. they are getting their news on facebook and google and bing and search engines. to be out there in that news sphere, you have to have different ways of attacking a and having connections and distribution arrangements. >> i would like to add that proliferation of new sites creates more demand for content, which creates more opportunity for professional writers. before you think about going into news as a business as an independent publisher, you have to think about what the need is, if there is a need in that particular space for another site, and then how you distinguish yourself and the content you pro
any intron decisions on this budget. that we had a big challenge to not only create a foundation for years to come, but that we would make sure that we had a budget that would reflect long-term investments and the long-term financial health of this city. we set out a course to collaborate with as many people as possible and to make sure that our budget was reflective of what san francisco knows how to do. that is collaborate and build consensus. we held over 10 budget town hall meetings. we've met over hundreds of residents, community organizations. we met with city commissioners, labor organizations, business owners, and activists, and throughout all those meetings, they are able to shift some $28 million in changes to the budget. this budget not only reflects our values, it is about the future of our city. you have heard all of those that you have attended. the budget town hall meetings and meetings with our community- based agencies. you need not hear from me today again about the goal, but i do want you to hear from people who i think are our challenge and reflective of our c
where there's a big boulder jammed into the bottom. every place has this backward trail, this labyrinth, leading you around. i was walking arpd this maze for about an hour before coming here and it does the same kind of thing where your mind settles, where you have to pay attention to where you are going. because if you look up for too long at all the passing architecture, you will forget where you are on the maze. you will end up in the wrong spot. you will end up going the wrong direction and you won't be able to find your way to the center. of course, out in the desert, you can't just walk off of the maze and out the front door and back into the street. out in the desert, you are there. the cliffs stand around you. the mazes are everywhere, passages opening up left and right. to write this book, house of rain, i walked a little bit over a thousand miles in legs from the four corners region from arizona, new mexico, colorado and california meet down to the chijuajua area of new mexico. there was one excavation along the way i remember out in the desert nears winslow, arizona. the dese
. i was not in business until 1961. he made a big deal out of working in clay. the things he was doing was something never seen before. >> it is a large scale bronze. it has been sitting here of the hall of justice since 1971. talk about what happens to the work of art out of the elements. >> the arts commission commissioned the piece. they did not set aside money for repair. it has slowly changed color. it was black. it has been restored. >> it has been restored to the original patina. >> there was no damage done to its. i do not think there were any holes made in it. they have been working on it for six or eight weeks. it is practically ready to go. i am very excited to see it done. >> over the course of the arts in richmond program, we have added almost 800 works of art into the public space. maintaining that is not something that the bond funds allow us to do. this is why you came up with the idea of art care. >> i hope we get the community going and get people who really like to be involved. we will give them a chance to be involved. if you are interested in art, this is a marvelo
the big sea sba a line of your sweat and then they take away your last word and then they take away another. now you put the keys back in your pocket and now you push on the door until it is in flame, until it is in flame. next reader is jane herschfield. . >> one sand grain among the others in winter wind. i wake with my hand held over the place of grief in my body. depend on nothing, the voice advices, but even that is useless. my ears are useless, my familiar and intimate tongue, my protecting hand is useless that wants to hold the single leaf to the tree and say, not this one. this one will be saved. a poem written on september 15th, 2001, against the knowledge that exactly what would happen was probably going to happen. the dead do not want us dead. the dead do not want us dead. such petty errors are left for the living. nor do they want our mourning. no gift to them. not rage, not weeping. return one of them, any one of them, to the earth and look. such foolish skipping, such telling of bad jokes, such feasting. even a cucumber, even a single anise seed, feasting. and, last po
sunday on the big screen. it will not always capture that. if you want to push the revolution now and start handing of guns, you might shoot me, right? we do not have an understanding of exactly what needs to happen and how it needs to happen. i think education is critical. we have to push for an education that we're just not receiving for the most part. there are pockets of that happening, but i think that awareness will produce the next scenario -- the next generation of folks in entertainment, in the arts and all these arenas that are high-profile but with the embedded with this consciousness that will demand the stand up and say something. no more of the michael jordan cannot speak out because politics is not a good thing to speak out against. it will be the jamaican musicians, the peter toshes and bob marleys -- the people -- the politicians had to be responsive to what people were saying and doing because there was a movement around these high- profile folks. they cannot just represent the movement. they have to come out of the movement. it has to be present in our communiti
insurance for screening for depression. and that is a big leap that, combined with parity legislation, that has allowed us now to health insurance, now have to pay for mental health services. both of these may be small steps in some respect are huge steps in our field because it helps take care of that discrimination and helps people become a little bit more accepting. that we are talking about health, major health conditions that they may be mental health, they may be emotional health. and as a matter of fact... language is important, emotional health transcends to all of what we are talking about today under behavioral health. because if you are emotionally healthy you have a strong character, you have confidence in yourself, your family is emotionally healthy. we're looking at lowering risk for behavioral health problems across the board. and of course our audience needs to realize that under the parity law small businesses of more than 50 people that are already covering certain conditions need to also cover mental health conditions as well, correct? correct, and some of your list
downtown and i saw a pillar that had been built in the last 4 years that a big block of sandstone that i recognized. it was probably wingate sandstone that had been hauled up there from about 200, 250 miles away, but i noticed in the pillar that was a gap at the bottom and i walked up and looked through the gap and i saw there were some posts in the distance and i looked around and there was a circle around the gap and there were signs around it and then each post a prism in it so that light going through the crack would hit the prism and that light would go to another prism and you would be able to tell the time of year by this object that was built in the last 4 years. and i saw this and i thought, what would archeologists think if they encountered this? they would look at this and say, what civilization was this? what religion drove them to do this? we keep doing the same things over and over again. many researchers believe these archeo-astronomical sites are very specifically designed where other researchers say it's all coincidence. but not long ago i was up at a place called chimne
and use our thumbs like fish fins and let your fish swim through the water it takes a big dive. >> and growing next to the river are a bed of flowers. opening one hand onfinger at a time watching the flower petal blossoms. we will take our other hand and turn it into a butterifiy much the butter fly will fly, fly, fly the and land on the flour and watch it fly away. drinking can a deer. take your thumb and the outside a n antlers. the deer hears a noise and in the distance is a hunter with a low and arrow. he sees that deer and aims for it. see your target and takes a shot and he misses and the deer escapes. the hunter's frustrated. i can't believe i missed that. he decides that hunting deer is not a night idea next time he will aim for an apple. thank you participating, you can sit down. give yourself a clap. those are very basic hand movements we use to tell a story. so, the next story we will show you is going to take place in this forest that we just created. i want you to imagine you are in the old forest and we will explain to you the story. >> that was namaste. the dev
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)